Slackware 14.2 is released!
After a long development cycle (including many betas and release candidates to get everything just exactly perfect) we're pleased to announce the availability of the new stable release. You'll find updates throughout the system, with the latest development tools and recent versions of applications, window managers, desktop environments, and utilities. The Linux kernel is updated to version 4.4.14 (part of the 4.4.x kernel series that will be getting long-term support from the kernel developers). We've brought together the best of these and other modern components and worked our magic on them. If you've used Slackware before, you'll find the system feels like home.

For additional information, see the official announcement and the release notes. For a complete list of included packages, see the package list.

Build scripts for all kinds of additional software for Slackware 14.2 can be found on the slackbuilds.org website.

Want to give Slackware 14.2 a test drive without modifying your disk drive? Then check out Slackware Live Edition! This is a complete Slackware installation that can run from a CD, DVD, or USB stick. Thanks to Eric Hameleers for the great work on this! Here's where to find it: http://bear.alienbase.nl/mirrors/slackware/slackware-live/

Need help? Check out our documentation site, docs.slackware.com. Stop by and share your knowledge!

Thanks to the Slackware team for all the hard work getting 14.2 ready for action! And of course, thanks to all the open source developers upstream, and to the Slackware community on linuxquestions.org for all the help with bug reports, suggestions, and patches. We couldn't have done it without you.

Enjoy the new stable release!

Pat and the Slackware crew

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Slackware 14.2 for ARM is also available. For details, see: http://arm.slackware.com

Slackware switching to the MariaDB database
From today's Slackware -current ChangeLog:

The big news here is the removal of MySQL in favor of MariaDB. This shouldn't really be a surprise on any level. The poll on LQ showed a large majority of our users were in favor of the change. It's my belief that the MariaDB Foundation will do a better job with the code, be more responsive to security concerns, and be more willing to work with the open source community. And while I don't think there is currently any issue with MySQL's licensing of the community edition for commercial uses, several threads on LQ showed that there is confusion about this, whereas with MariaDB the freedom to use the software is quite clear. Thanks are due to Heinz Wiesinger for his work on transitioning the build script, testing, and getting us all behind this move. He's been working with MariaDB (and their developers) for several years now. Vincent Batts also had a hand in the early discussions here -- he met Daniel Bartholomew of MariaDB on a train last year and got a copy of the source to play with to pass the time on the journey (ah, the miracle of thumbdrives :), and was impressed with not only MariaDB itself, but also with the welcome that Slackware was getting. We expect they'll be responsive to any concerns we have. In the vast majority of situations, MariaDB is entirely compatible with existing MySQL databases and will drop right in with no changes required. There's an article available outlining the areas in which MariaDB differs from MySQL that I'd recommend reading:
https://kb.askmonty.org/v/mariadb-versus-mysql-compatibility/
Thanks to the MariaDB Foundation! We look forward to working with you.

For more information about MariaDB, visit their website: http://mariadb.org

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